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Dementia FAQ

With so many different facts, figures and experiences of dementia, it's natural to have questions.

    • I Keep Forgetting Things, Do I Have Dementia?

      The early symptoms of dementia can easily be mistaken for age-related forgetfulness, which is something we may all experience

      The early symptoms of dementia can easily be mistaken for age-related forgetfulness, which is something we may all experience. However, with dementia, this memory loss is more significant and will gradually get worse over time.

      People with dementia will struggle with everyday tasks, such how to pay bills or remember directions when driving. In the later stages, this can progress to not knowing how to bathe and dress, and not being able to recognise people that they know.

      If you're experiencing regular issues with your memory, then it's a good idea to talk about this with your GP. There are several other reasons that memory problems can present, such as depressions, stroke, infections, severe nutrient deficiencies, thyroid abnormalities and medication side effects.

    • How is Dementia Diagnosed?

      There are a range of dementia tests and diagnostic procedures that are used to diagnose dementia.

      There are a range of dementia tests and diagnostic procedures that are used to diagnose dementia.

      This diagnostic process first involves talking to the patient and their family. Cognitive tests will then be undertaken to evaluate memory, concentration and attention span. Blood tests and brain scans can also be helpful.

    • Is Dementia a Natural Part of Aging? 

      Dementia usually affects people over the age of 65

      Although dementia usually affects people over the age of 65, it's not a natural part of aging.

    • Does Dementia Run in the Family?

      Dementia becomes more common as people get older

      Dementia becomes more common as people get older and many of us have a relative living with the condition.

      Having a relative with dementia doesn't necessarily mean you're at a higher risk for developing dementia yourself. This is because the majority of dementia types don't have a strong genetic component.

      However, there are some forms of early-onset Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) that are caused by genetic mutations.

    • What Is the Treatment for Dementia?

      Although there's currently no cure for dementia, there are certain treatment options available.

      Although there's currently no cure for dementia, there are certain treatment options available. These treatments aim to relieve and reduce the severity of the symptoms. Some treatments can also help to slow the progression of dementia

    Need more help?

    We hope you'll find the answers you're looking for here, but if you don't, do feel free to reach out to us!

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